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Bringing the outside in: how to make a planter


19/01/2024


L E T ' S B R I N G

   T H E

O U T S I D E I N ...



Whilst work is of a much slower pace at this time of the year, I have exciting projects underway and I spend more time working behind the scenes, mainly at my desk. From sketching and mood board creating for all of my wonderful bride and grooms, to ordering seeds and garden bits and bobs (more on that soon!) I find that productive days can also be tailored for myself, although days for myself are still centred around flowers. With this in mind, one rainy morning this week, I wondered how I could bring the outside in to accompany me...

Flowers are scarce. A few brightly coloured daffodils stand to attention and dainty snowdrops poke up from the ground, but not much more. Similarly to myself, nature is kept busy behind the scenes as roots are working hard for coming blooms, and so, flowers have now been swapped (temporarily) for spring bulbs. I treated myself to a selection of white Hyacinth, Muscari, and Narcissus, with a little project in mind. Whilst I am taking January in my stride by getting outside and practising gratitude for the nature that surrounds me, there is nothing quite like being at home, and to be expected, I'm spending more time here during the colder months. A Spring Planter is the perfect way to bring nature indoors. Personally, I like to place mine on my dining room table for all to admire.


Scroll down to find out how to create your own Spring Planter.




 



H O W T O M A K E

A S P R I N G

P L A N T E R


Let's begin to create your spring planter, a joyous arrangement which offers a spot of floral escapism and the opportunity to watch bulbs sprout into flowers from the comfort of your own home.


All ingredients can be found at your local garden centre, florist, or some larger supermarkets. Happy planting!




INGREDIENTS


  • A planter of some description (a ceramic bowl or deep, wide garden pot work well)

  • Compost

  • Gravel

  • A selection of potted bulbs (I used x 2 muscari, x 2 narcissus, and x 1 hyacinth)

  • Foraged twigs/branches

  • Sharp secateurs

  • Fresh moss (either sphagnum moss or carpet moss work well)

  • Quail egg shells (optional)






1. I am using my favourite Littleton Oval Basket Planter from Neptune. Opt for planters that are wide, but also deep, giving enough space for roots to grow, whilst still being able to be displayed on the centre of your dining table or coffee table. Once you have selected your planter, its time to get to work!








2. Firstly, pour a layer of gravel at the bottom of your planter. This acts as a source of drainage when watering your bulbs.







3. Place in your compost, making sure to fill your planter. Take note that you will need room to dig small holes to place your bulbs. You can always add more compost later on.







4. Dig holes for your bulbs to sit comfortably in your planter. I like to have the bulbs showing, I think they look quite lovely like that. Measure the depth of your hole by putting your bulbs next to the planter to gauge how deep the hole needs to be.







5. I would encourage you to give your bulbs a good water a few hours before removing them from their plastic trays. Remove them by squeezing gently and lifting. Spring bulbs tend to have hardy roots so carefully breaking them up is absolutely fine. I like to do this so each bulb has more space.









6. Arrange your bulbs as you wish, making sure their roots are embedded within the compost. I like to place my bigger bulbs (like Hyacinth and Narcissus) in first and then add the Muscari bulbs to fill the gaps (as they are so tiny!)







7. Once you are happy with your planted arrangement, make sure compost fills any gaps. Next, use your moss to decorate the top. Here I have used sphagnum moss, which was leftover from my Christmas Wreath. To bring it back to life, simply dunk in some fresh water. Carpet moss works well too.








8. Now its time to decorate your planted arrangement. I enjoy using foraged twigs. Not only do they look wonderful with sweet, little catkins hanging, they also act as a great support structure for your bulbs to grow upon. Finish with some small quail egg shells. This also reminds me that Easter, my favourite time of year, will soon be here!






Happy Planting! I hope you enjoy connecting with nature and inviting the outdoors in. Do let me know if you give this a go.


With Love

Sophie x 


 

 I W O U L D L O V E
T O K N OW I F T H E R E
A R E A N Y O T H E R
P R O J E C T S
Y O U W O U L D L I K E
T O S E E !

C O M M E N T B E L O W X



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